Where does vegan leather come from? – Grape Cat

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Where does vegan leather come from?

Posted on November 30, 2016

Where does vegan leather come from?

What is vegan leather? Many different materials are used to make vegan leather, faux leather, pleather, or leatherette. Vegan leather jacket, vegan handbags, vegan purses, and vegan shoes use these materials.

One of the most popular materials used in the faux leather fabric is PVC. Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is made up of polyurethane and textile-polymer composite microfibers. This petroleum based product has some environmental concerns. PVC production produces dioxins that can increase cancer risk.Polyurethane (PU) requires excessive levels of toxic substances like dimethylformamide. Dimethylformamide has links to cancer and congenital disabilities, and acetic acid, high doses can damage skin and eyes.

Polyurethane (PU) requires excessive levels of toxic substances like dimethylformamide. Dimethylformamide has links to cancer and congenital disabilities, and acetic acid, high doses can damage skin and eyes.

We have also seen synthetic leather made from pineapple leaves, mushrooms, cork, waxed cotton, vegetan, Lorica, Birko-Flor, Birkibuc or Kydex.All materials are not environmentally friendly. There is no such thing as a green material. They all have some environmental cost associated with them. It takes a lot of energy and chemicals to recycle materials too.

All materials are not environmentally friendly. There is no such thing as a green material. They all have some environmental cost associated with them. It takes a lot of energy and chemicals to recycle materials too.

Animal Leather requires a lot of food, water, and land to produce. Animals on factory farms produce 130 times as much excrement as the entire human population, without the benefit of waste treatment.

Although some leathermakers deceptively tout their products as “eco-friendly,” turning skin into leather also requires massive amounts of energy and dangerous chemicals. Mineral salts, formaldehyde, coal-tar derivatives, and various oils, dyes, and finishes. Most leather produced in the U.S. is chrome-tanned. Chromium is considered hazardous by the EPA.

People who work in and live near tanneries die from cancer caused by exposure to toxic chemicals.

Some green alternatives can be recycled bicycle tires by Alchemy Goods and recycled cement bags by Malia Designs.

Vegans primary goal is to reduce harm to animals, people, and the environment.

 

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